News Snippets for 1924

What follows are news snippets with Crich Parish interest from various newspapers for 1924.

As with all transcriptions there could be "typos" which is always a possibilty with audio trancriptions, although care has been taken.

The following index shows parish names that appear in some of the reports – allow for spelling variations; plus omissions are possible owing to human error. The list is of transcribed names, there are other names in the images.

ALLSOP CHECKLEY HAYNES RANKIN STEWARDSON
ALLWOOD COWLISHAW HOUSE ROE STORER
AMATT CURZON HUMPHREY ROLLINSON SULLEY
BOAG DONALDSON LEAFE ROWE WEST
BONNINGTON ELSE LYNAM RYDE WETTON
BOOTH FLINT MACDONALD SELLORS WHEELDON
BROWN FOX MERCER SMITH WRAGG
BUNTING GAUNT MERRIMAN STACEY  

In the transcriptions names have been capitalised to aid quick searches; also some transcriptions have had minor edits.

Many of the newspaper reports of weddings at the time contained full details of clothing, bestman, bridesmaids, congregation and a list of presents received. Only the basic marriage details have been transcribed. Similarly funeral reports often gave long lists of mourners and floral tributes received. Refer to the original newspapers, which can be found on the Find My Past website, if the additional information is of interest.

In 1924 there were a great many references to the Crich Memorial Tower and other memorials to the Sherwood Foresters; also the poor state of the Crich roads and paricularly the dangerous Bull Bridge.

1924 newspapers

Derbyshire Times 12 January 1924
Sgt J.B.HUMPHREY, who has been transferred from Glapwell to Crich, started duty to there this week.

Derbyshire Advertiser and Journal 2 February 1924
It is with regret we record the death of a former Fritchley resident, Mr Frederick E. AMATT, who died at Leicester on Thursday last at the age of 54 years. Mr AMATT , who went to reside in Harborough Road, Leicester, some 15 years ago, had resided in Fritchley the best part of his life. He was a well-known footballer and he was in the goal for Crich when the great game was played between Fritchley and Crich on Bull Bridge Hill Ground. Some years ago he had a very severe illness at Fritchley, and afterwards he went to where the climate was a little milder, and he had a large allotment at Leicester. He was only taken ill on Monday week, and he was taken to the Infirmary, where he died on the following Thursday. He leaves one son and daughter to mourn his loss – one son being killed in the Dardanelles.
[there followed a report of the funeral and photograph]

photo f Frederick Amatt

Derbyshire Times 9 February 1924
Sympathy is felt for those who are out of work at Crich, caused by the slackness of trade at the mills and various works in the vicinity.

Derbyshire Times 9 February 1924
Mr A. MERCER M.P.S., of Crich, who has installed a wireless, received on Sunday night from Birmingham a full account of the death of ex-president WILSON and his career. The same evening by wireless from Aberdeen he heard distinctly a woman singing there.

Derbyshire Times 9 February 1924
We regret to announce the death of Mr Frederick Ernest AMATT, which took place at Leicester on the 24th ult. The deceased, who was born at Fritchley 54 years ago, left his native village 18 years ago to go into business at Leicester. His wife predeceased him some years ago, and he leaves a son, Harold AMATT, who resides at Swanwick, and a daughter Minnie AMATT , resident at Leicester. His eldest son, Ernest, was killed in the war.
[see son Joseph Ernest AMATT’s WW1 record: Joseph Ernest AMATT]

Derbyshire Times 9 February 1924
On Monday our Crich correspondent met with a respectable workman of Crich returning from Belper Labour Exchange. The man said, “It is a shame that we can’t get the dole at Crich instead of having to walk 5 miles each way to Belper.” Our representative replied that a suggestion to that effect was made in The Derbyshire Times a few years ago. The man quickly answered. “Yes, I saw it. I have taken The Derbyshire Times for 50 years".

Derbyshire Times 9 February 1924
Much consternation was caused that Fritchley on Sunday morning by an outbreak of fire in the Friends Meeting House. The first to observe the fire was Mr George SMITH, who was on his way to the Meeting House. He at once raised an alarm, and soon there were plenty of willing helpers, who with buckets of water and a garden hose eventually extinguished the blaze. The fire broke out at the end of the roof, and it is surmised that it was caused by a spark or a piece of burning paper from a neighbouring chimney. The building is insured, and a rough estimate of the damage done is about £20. Sgt James HUMPHREY, of Crich, who was early on the scene, rendered valuable help.

Ripley and Heanor News 15 February 1924
Since the opening ceremony of the Memorial to Sherwood Foresters at Crich nearly £150 has been received from admission fees to view the tower. As the fee is 3d, this represents somewhere about 12,000 persons have paid a visit to Crich to view the Tower.

Derby Daily Telegraph 29 February 1924
On Thursday Mr and Mrs W.E. WETTON, of 11, Walter Street, Derby, celebrated their golden wedding. Both of them are 72 years of age, and they lived at Crich before taking up their residents in the county time. Among their friends of past days was Miss Florence Nightingale. Mr WETTON is an old volunteer, and is proud of his family’s service history, his father being the late colour Sgt WETTON, of the 95th Regiment, who fought at the Battle of Alma.
[see Colour Sgt WETTON's record: Thomas WETTON]

Derbyshire Times 8 March 1924
After the blizzard last week Crich awoke on Sunday morning to find the roads impassable, being blocked with snow. Earlier in the day, however, the snowplough was brought into requisition.

Derbyshire Times 8 March 1924
At the Wesleyan Chapel, Crich, on Sunday the unveiling dedication of a memorial to teachers and scholars fell in the Great War was performed by Mr H.Basil BOAG, and the service was good ducted by the Rev Mr HUDD, the soloist being Mrs HUDD.
[see the memorial plaque: Wesleyan WW1 memorial]

Derbyshire Times 8 March 1924
After an illness extending over two years Mrs Mary Ann ALLWOOD was laid to rest in Crich Parish Churchyard on Wednesday last week. The deceased, who died on the previous Friday at home at Wakebridge, was 68 years of age. She was a native of Crich, and leaves a husband, two sons and three daughters.
[there followed a report of the funeral]

Derbyshire Times 8 March 1924
The funeral took place at the Crich Parish Church on Wednesday last week of Mr John BONNINGTON, who passed away at his home, Mount Pleasant, Crich, on the previous Saturday, in his 76th year.
[a report of the funeral followed]
The deceased lost an eye many years ago at the Wire Works Ambergate, and subsequently was employed at Whatstandwell Quarries as a carter. He was a native of Crich, and leaves a widow.

Derbyshire Times 8 March 1924
The death took place at Tamworth the end of last week of a well-known Crich man in the person of Mr George TOMLINSON, who was in his 67th year. Mr TOMLINSON left Crich about 20 years ago. He leaves a widow and a son.

Derbyshire Times 8 March 1924
Congratulations to Mr William COWLISHAW, of Town End, Crich, who celebrates his 87th birthday this week Mr COWLISHAW is a big strong man, and thinks nothing of walking 15 or 20 miles to see Crich men play football. He is a native of Crich. His wife died 17 years ago, and he has a son at Nottingham and a daughter at Crich, both married.

Ripley and Heanor News 28 March 1924
At an inquest at Crich on Wednesday, on Joseph SMITH, quarryman, in the employ of the Clay Cross Co., who was found pinned by a lump of stone weighing 35 cwt. Dr H.J. RANKIN stated that death was due to shock following the accident. The coroner returned a verdict accordingly.

Derbyshire Times 29 March 1924
Mr Joseph SULLEY, of Crich, celebrated his 72nd birthday on Sunday, and still retains his vigorous voice at singing.

Derbyshire Times 29 March 1924
The death took place on Saturday of an old and esteemed woman, who was born at Wheatcroft, Crich, about 79 years ago, in the person of Mrs Mary BOAG, of Chase Cottage, Ambergate. The deceased was the wife of Mr H. Basil BOAG, a well-known businessman at Crich and surrounding districts.

Derbyshire Times 29 March 1924
Mr I. BOOTH, of Bull Bridge, on arriving late at Crich on Saturday, ran his motor into the lamppost in the Market Place, the crash from which awakened residents there who were in bed at the time. The lamp not being lighted and the night dark prevented Mr BOOTH seeing the danger. The lamppost escaped damage, but the motor suffered slightly.
[see later article on 5 April 1924]

Derbyshire Times 29 March 1924
The death took place on Thursday last week of Miss Kathleen Ivy May WEST, daughter of Mrs WEST and the late Mr George WEST, Market Place, Crich. The funeral took place on Monday at West Hallam, where the deceased was born about 15 years ago. Sympathy is felt for Mrs WEST and family.

Derbyshire Times 29 March 1924
On Wednesday last week, the late Mrs Jane STACEY, of the Bungalow, Crich, who died on the previous Saturday at the age of nearly 97 years, was interred, at the Crich Parish Churchyard, where her late husband and son were buried some years ago.
[there followed a report of the funeral; subsequently there were many items concerned with sale of her bungalow]

Derbyshire Times 5 April 1924
Mr I. BOOTH, of Saw Mills, Ambergate, writes to state that the motorcar which had an accident at Crich referred to in these notes last week, was not his, but was owned and driven by Mr W. BROWN, Fritchley. He adds that the accident took place at 8pm and the only damage to the car was a bent hubcap. In reference to the above our correspondent states that his facts were given him by an eyewitness of the accident, and the only mistake was the name of the owner of the car. The eyewitness states that the time of the mishap was 8.45pm.

Derbyshire Times 5 April 1924
Congratulations to Mr William FLINT, of Fritchley, who celebrated his 88th year on Thursday, having been born in Nottinghamshire on April 3, 1836. Mr FLINT enjoyed good health and goes out almost daily with his pony and trap. Mr FLINT has resided in Fritchley about 60 years, and is now a State pensioner.

Derbyshire Times 5 April 1924
Mrs Mary BOAG, wife of Mr Henry Basil BOAG who passed away at her home Chase Cottage, Ambergate, on the 22nd ult. as reported last week, was laid to rest at Crich Churchyard. The deceased, who had been an invalid for some time,, was born at Stadin Hall, Buxton, on April 9, 1844, but had spent the greater part of life in Crich Parish.
[there followed a report of the funeral]

Derbyshire Times 5 April 1924
The interment took place at Crich Parish Churchyard on Thursday last week of Mr Joseph SMITH, of Town End, Crich, who was accidentally killed on the previous Monday at the Cliff Quarry, Crich, as reported in our last issue.
[there followed a report of the funeral]

Derbyshire Times 10 May 1924
Milk has been this week reduced from 6d per quart to 5d per quart at Crich for the summer months. We are informed that a farmer at Park Head, Crich delivers milk in Crich at 5d per quart in the winter and 4d per quart in the summer.

Derbyshire Times 17 May 1924
I thank you so much for that lovely Fountain Pen, which I received on Monday morning, I think it will be very useful to me. Wishing your paper every success. I remain, chummily yours Norman LYNAM, Crich Carr, Whatstandwell
[this letter was written to “Pied Piper” which was a children’s section of the paper; nearly all the letters to it used the word “chummily"; there were many Crich children who, over the year, received a fountain pen and sent "chummily" appreciation letters]

Derbyshire Times 17 May 1924
The Rev J. Bertram BUNTING, an old friend and former member of the Alderwasley Church choir, who is now spending a holiday in England, assisted at the services on Easter Day at Alderwasley Church. Mr BUNTING , who has a church at Duck Lane Saskatchewan, also one at Rosthern, and who is likewise connected with the work of several other churches there, is the son of Mr Joseph BUNTING of Eden Bank, Whatstandwell, with whom he is now staying until August when he returns to Canada.
[Note : he was once the vicar at Bonsall and was the 1st cousin of the late Crich vicar William BUNTING]

Derbyshire Times 17 May 1924
The funeral took place at the Crich Parish Church on Monday of the late Mr Hiram STORER, who died on the previous Friday at his home in Fritchley. The deceased, who had been ailing for the past year, was a native of Fritchley and was in his 67th year.
[there followed a report of the funeral]

Derbyshire Advertiser and Journal 31 May 1924
On Saturday last, May 24, Empire Day was quietly observed in Crich. Several parties visited the War Memorial and at night the lamp was lighted in remembrance of the occasion. Songs of the Empire was sung in the day schools on Friday morning and a half holiday was given in the afternoon.
[note: it was the beacon that was lit not the Tower, which had illumination in later years; the beacon was also lit to commemorate the significant battle dates fought by the Sherwood Foresters]

Derbyshire Times 7 June 1924
The funeral took place at Crich Parish Church on Saturday of Mr Joseph SELLERS, who died on the previous Wednesday at Sheffield, at the age of 50 years. The deceased was a native of Crich, but left 23 years ago for Sheffield where he resided until his death. Mr SELLERS was a valued member of the Crich United Silver Band and a footballer of note, and also took a deep interest in the welfare of his native village.
[there followed a report of the funeral]

Derbyshire Times 7 June 1924
John Henry SMITH, Crich, was fined 5s for driving a motorcycle without two brakes at Heage on May 13.

Derbyshire Times 21 June 1924
A wedding took place at St Anne’s Church, Ambergate on Monday, when the contracting parties were Mr Guy Victor ELSE, son of Mr C.J. ELSE, of Park Lodge, Fritchley, and Miss Kathleen Mary Hewitt SIMPSON, daughter of Mr and Mrs James Hewitt SIMPSON, of Canal House, Ambergate. The bridegroom’s father is well-known in the Crich and Fritchley district as in addition to being a Churchwarden he is also the vice-chairman of the Crich Parish Council.
[there followed a report of the wedding]
The bridegroom, who is a motor engineer at Fritchley and Ambergate, was educated at the Herbert Strutt School, Belper. During the war he served with the R.G.A. in France and later with the army of occupation in Germany. For the time being Mr and Mrs ELSE will reside at Chase Farm, Ambergate.
[ see his WW1 army record: Guy Victor ELSE]

Derbyshire Times 28 June 1924
One would not have thought it necessary to warn parents that children of tender years should not be given intoxicants, but apparently some people still do not know that the law steps in even if common sense fails.
At Belper Police Court, on Thursday, Elsie LEAFE and Audrey HOUSE, Crich, were both fined 5s each for giving intoxicating drink to Dorothy LEAFE , a child under five years, without medical certificate, at Heage on June 8th. Defendants pleaded ignorance of the law. The case was the first of its kind to come before the Bench.

Derbyshire Advertiser and Journal 5 July 1924
On Tuesday evening the beacon on the Sherwood Foresters Memorial on Crich Cliff was lighted in commemoration of the anniversary of the great battle on the Somme on July 1 in which the Sherwoods greatly distinguished themselves.

Derbyshire Times 12 July 1924
Mr Herbert MERCER, of Crich, was one of the successful candidates to receive the degrees of Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery at the Sheffield University on Saturday. Mr MERCER is the only son of Mr A. MERCER. M.P.S, of Crich.
[ see Herbert’s WW1 record: Herbert MERCER]

Derbyshire Times 12 July 1924
Mr R.S. MERRIMAN, late of Snowdrop Valley, Crich, has now taken up his residence at “Amber View” Sawmills, Bull Bridge, which property he recently purchased. Mr MERRIMAN has resided in the locality for several years.

Derbyshire Times 12 July 1924
An accident befell Mr William ROWE, son of Mrs ROWE, of the “Shoulder of Mutton” Inn, Fritchley, on Friday last week. While following his occupation at the Wingfield Manor Colliery he sustained a fractured thigh and was removed to the Derbyshire Royal Infirmary, where he was detained.

Derbyshire Times 12 July 1924
The morning and evening services at the Crich Parish Church, on Sunday, were conducted by the Rev J.B. BUNTING, rector of Buck Lake, Saskatchewan, Canada, whose sermons were full of descriptive scenes and mode of living in Canada. Mr BUNTING , who was born at Alderwasley, is a son of Mr Joseph BUNTING, of Eden Bank Whatstandwell, who is now vicar’s warden at Crich. The collections were in aid of the Colonial and Continental Church Society.

Derbyshire Times 12 July 1924
The funeral took place on Tuesday at the Crich Parish Church of Mr James LYNAM, of the Post Office, Fritchley, who passed away on the previous Saturday. The deceased who was born at Old Radford, Nottingham, on 30 September 1842, had lived at Fritchley for 32 years. His wife predeceased him about three years ago and was also buried at Crich. He leaves a grown-up family of five daughters and two sons.
[there followed a report of the funeral]

Derbyshire Times 13 September 1924
Mr J.W. CHECKLEY, confectioner and baker of Crich, has secured the contract from the Belper Guardians for the supply of flour and bread to the Union Workhouse and cottage homes from October 1 to December 31, 1924 inclusive.

Derbyshire Times 20 September 1924
Mr John RYDE, eldest son of Mr and Mrs George RYDE, of the Red Lion Hotel, Fritchley, was taken on Monday to the Derbyshire Royal Infirmary, where he was detained in anticipation of an operation.

Derbyshire Times 20 September 1924
Frank ROLLINSON, son of Mr Albert ROLLINSON of Railway House, Crich, when at work in the Oakerthorpe Colliery, had one of his hands badly crushed there recently. He is making satisfactory recovery under the care of the doctors MACDONALD and RANKIN.

Derbyshire Times 20 September 1924
The lighting of the public lamps at Crich and other parts of the parish will start on Saturday the 27th inst. The Crich Parish Council were very enthusiastic about two years ago regarding the introduction of electric lighting which would be much cheaper and better than gas. Perhaps we shall hear further hereon.

Derbyshire Times 20 September 1924
Mr Henry STEWARTSON, youngest son of Mr and Mrs Robert STEWARTSON, of the Orchard, Whatstandwell, who met with a serious accident when bicycling home from Lea Mills, where he is employed, fell off his machine, fracturing his arm. He was quickly conveyed to the Derbyshire Royal Infirmary, where he was attended to, and returned to his parents home, where he is now making fast recovery.

Derbyshire Times 4 October 1924
J.H. SMITH, Market Place, Crich, High-class Family Butcher, now the pork is in season, calls attention to his Noted Pork Pies, Polonies, Sausages, etc, prepared under his personal supervision and hygienic conditions.

Derbyshire Times 4 October 1924
We understand from Mr DONALDSON who resides near the Crich Reservoir, that recently foxes visited his premises and killed some of his fowls. Poultry owners will no doubt take note.

Derbyshire Times 4 October 1924
On Thursday last week the beacon was lighted on the Sherwood Foresters War Memorial, Crich, to commemorate the Battle of Loos (1915). On Monday night the beacon was again lighted to commemorate the Battle of St Quintin (1918). Many of our Crich boys were in this battle. It was in this engagement that the gallant Sherwood Foresters (46th Division) broke the Hindenburg Line and had to swim across St Quintin Canal to achieve it.

Derbyshire Times 4 October 1924
Jo SMITH, a little fair-haired boy, aged three years, youngest son of Mr and Mrs Wilfred SMITH, of Sun Lane, Crich, who on the road on Saturday, close to the Rising Sun Hotel, Crich, was hit on the right cheek by the mudguard of a passing motorcar and pitched a considerable distance clear of the car. He was quickly picked up and taken to his home, where it was found that the only injuries were scratches on the face and shock.
[Joseph later served in WW2: Joseph Alan SMITH]

Derby Daily Telegraph 15 October 1924
“A very troublesome boy,” was the Chairman’s description of Samuel GAUNT, a 16 year old Crich miner, charged with housebreaking and theft at South Wingfield. Prisoner had previously been sent to an Industrial School, and since his release had twice been in trouble for petty larceny. He was now sentenced to three years detention at a Borstal Institution.

Derbyshire Times 1 November 1924
The death took place on Sunday of Mrs Rebecca FOX, at home, on Crich Common, after an illness extending over several months.

Derbyshire Times 1 November 1924
A serious motorcycle accident occurred near the Belper end of Ambergate on Saturday morning. As Mr Richard LYNAM, son of Councillor Fred LYNAM, chairman of the Crich Parish Council, was motorcycling to Belper he came into collision with a large motor van belonging to Messrs Peak Frean and Co. which was drawing out from the front of Mr Wibberley’s shop, seriously injuring his leg and causing slight concussion. First aid was rendered by Messrs Sam and Harold VARNEY. Dr ALLEN was phoned for and on his arrival he found no bones were broken and ordered Mr LYNAM’s removal to Fritchley.

Derbyshire Times 1 November 1924
The amusement caterers who visited Crich some time ago were so well patronised that they came to conclusion that a permanent house of entertainment would prove acceptable to the inhabitants, and the result is that Crich is to have a cinema. The Cinema Company have secured a convenient site on Crich Common, and it is expected that the erection will shortly be commenced. The building is to accommodate over 300.
[ more about the cinema: Crich Cinema]

Derbyshire Times 15 November 1924
We regret to say that Mr George HAYNES of Crich, who met with a serious motor accident on election day, is still confined to his bed. Mr HAYNES is a well-known builder and belongs to an old Crich family.

Derbyshire Times 15 November 1924
Mr Bert HUMPHREY, son of Sgt HUMPHREY, Crich, who was employed as gardener at Hardwick Hall, has had a narrow escape from serious injury when motorcycling at Shirland. He came into collision with another motorcyclist coming in the opposite direction. Both riders luckily escaped serious injuries, but the machines were damaged.

Derbyshire Times 15 November 1924
The beacon was lighted on the Sherwood Foresters War Memorial on Crich Hill on Tuesday in memory of Armistice Day. Buzzers in Crich district were blown at 11 o’clock to signal the beginning of the silence, and again at two minutes past to denote its ending.

Derbyshire Times 15 November 1924
It has been mentioned to us that the provision of a water supply in the vicinity of the Crich War Memorial would be a distinct boon to the relatives and friends of those gallant men from the parish who fell. The memorial which is situated in the churchyard, is naturally frequently visited by people for the purpose of placing wreaths, etc thereon. At the present time when water is needed to keep the flowers alive, journeys have to be made to friends houses for the purpose. It is with a certain amount of diffidence that we apply our pen to this subject, but perhaps the matter only needs mentioning for what is desired to become accomplished. Would it, say, be possible to install a small ornamental fountain?

Derby Daily Telegraph 19 November 1924
John WHEELDON , generally known as John GAUNT, the Ratcatcher, was buried on Tuesday at the village of Crich. He was 73 years of age, and is believed to have killed over a quarter of a million rodents. He specialised in the use of foxes for right catching, and was known the land over for his other successful methods.

photo of Jacj Gaunt ratcatcher Crich

[There was also an obituary to him in the Derbyshire Times dated 22 November 1924]

Derbyshire Times 22 November 1924
The wedding took place at the Crich Parish Church on Sunday of Miss Amy Violet CHECKLEY, daughter of Mr and Mrs J.W. CHECKLEY, Victoria House, Crich and Mr Norman ALLSOP, son of Mr and Mrs J.F. ALLSOP, Tor Cottage, Crich.
[there followed a report of the wedding]

Derbyshire Times 22 November 1924
The marriage took place on Saturday at the P.M. Chapel, Belper, of Miss Vera CURZON, daughter of Mrs Eliza CURZON, Crich Common, and Mr John Frederick ALLSOP, Crich Common.
[there followed a report of the wedding]

Derbyshire Times 22 November 1924
A United evangelistic mission service was conducted on Sunday by Mr Frank PINFOLD at the Baptist Chapel, Crich.

Derby Daily Telegraph 27 November 1924
The village of Crich, near Matlock, has been awakened from its slumbers. A company of men and women belonging to the various Nonconformist Churches in the village sought out Mr PENFOLD, the well-known tent evangelist, who was conducting a mission in the village of Heage , nearby, and invited him to Crich to endeavour to revive the spiritual life of the people. Mr PENFOLD readily accepted the invitation and commenced his mission on Sunday evening, November 16, when a large congregation assembled to welcome him.
[see article on this event: Frank PINFOLD evangelist]

Derby Daily Telegraph 9 December 1924
George WRAGG (27), of Crich, a minor employed by the Wingfield Manor Colliery Co., was admitted to the Royal Infirmary on Monday afternoon with injuries to the back. He was crushed between two tubs while working in the pit.